December 21st, 2009

writing, pen

Thorns & Stream's Descent

A
star
single
piercing
through
sharpened
thorns; one
bright eye to
answer. a spark
of life in a deadly
land where living is
suffering and merciless.


Into Mordor proper we go - in this case, to the thorns and the dessication. The first poem is a 'concrete' or shaped poem with each stanza forming a thorn. The second is a (somewhat rambling) examination of the waters that finally trickled down within the rock to keep them alive in that dry, dead place.

Thorns
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Stream's Descent
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illumination

Gaffer & Stranger

When death is nigh and storms abound
Deep within my heart
I find your words.


Two for Sam, who persevered. The first is for his Gaffer, without whose horse-sense wisdom he would have been adrift and the second for the intensity he dealt with in watching his Master falling deeper beneath his burden and into the edges of madness. Gaffer is somewhat based on a song by Michael Card that he wrote for his own grandfather.

Gaffer
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Stranger
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booktower

Carrying & Slopes of Ash

I'll hold to you fast,
somehow I'll pull us through,
As a bird with broken wings will still drag though the ash.
As long as my legs will carry me,
I'll carry you.


Nearly to the goal but exhausted and overcome, Frodo's helplessness in the grip of darkness and Sam's faithfulness to see them both through to the end.

Carrying
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Slopes of Ash
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writing, pen

Touch of Doom

Even as he sought to hold it,
His fate was surely sealed.
He reached for his life, but only Death took his hand,
In a grip that he had not the strength to break.


Gollum makes his final move and is cursed by the very thing he desires.

The word "doom" is one of those odd things in the English language that has such a dark and fateful meaning but sounds a bit silly. I immediately think of cartoonish The End is Nigh type monks waving wooden signs and chanting "Dooom! Doooooooom!" which makes it difficult to use in serious poetry. I finally chose to use it here because Tolkien chose it specifically and used it specifically and nothing else really quite works. Was it fate or a bane? No, not quite...it really was doom.

Touch of Doom
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writing, pen

Not Remembering

I pity you, that your hopes yet live;
I am sorry that I must see
Them die.


Of the two lives left on that mountain, only one of them was ready to live - and really, he was the only reason for the other to even bother with drawing another breath.

Not Remembering
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illumination

Steadfast - for Sam

You’re the one
Who must be strong,
Your heart must beat and strive for two;
In the depths of deepest need
Death cannot reach
The Shire’s life yet green in you.


One more for Sam at Sammath Naur - because darn it, he's that amazing. This is written in a pattern with a refrain, and if I were a musical person would be one of a handful I would probably try to write a tune for.

Steadfast
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illumination

Cormallen

Glory and Trumpets!

For anyone who has been reading through the dark and angsty war-torn poetry set, you would be well excused to forget there could be lighter topics - at last, the 'happy ending' (at least before the sad ending) is begun. Cormallen is from Sam's point of view with an aim of capturing that blend of poetic and simple country that so characterized his turns of phrase.

Cormallen
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bilbo

Nodding by the Fire

Nodding in his carven chair
Among his cushions and shawls he sits


The Travellers return to Rivendell at last, and their beloved, aged Bilbo awaits them by his fire ready to hear all about their Adventure... assuming he can stay awake.

Nodding by the Fire
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writing, pen

Scouring & The Party Tree

Behold the ruin, the ravaged Shire,
The trees are felled and burned with fire


Two for the ravaged Shire - what a terrible loss, and what a terrible, vengeful blow they found upon their homecoming. Merry 'should have stuffed that pouch down his throat' as he said.

Scouring
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The Party Tree
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